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British Architect Designs Stunning Mirrored Tree House For His Small Children

Treehouse, Scott Kyson Architecture, London, Dezeen
A small garden pavilion known as “Treehouse” is an elaborate and brilliantly designed playhouse by British architect Scott Kyson. The tree house was constructed for Kyson’s three young children and utilized modern materials to create a truly unique design.

Kyson describes it as, “An abstract take on a traditional concept, using a material palette of charred timber and smoke mirrors, the installation explores the raw design principles of form, light and texture.”

Treehouse, Scott Kyson Architecture, London, Dezeen

The nearly 15 by 9 foot structure is clad in smoked glass that creates a reflective and whimsical effect to the exterior. The mirrored façade allows the structure to virtually blend into its surroundings, creating the ultimate invisible hideaway for a child.

Equally impressive, in terms of his use of materials, is the addition of charred wood. The wood was created using a Japanese technique known as Shou Sugi Ban, which involves preserving wood through charring it with fire. It is seen as a Japanese art form and this ancient technique is a more sustainable way of treating wood versus utilizing chemicals for preservation. Numerous small blocks of this wood were also added as seating outside of the small house.

Treehouse, Scott Kyson Architecture, London, Dezeen

Unlike traditional tree houses, that are most likely permanent in placement, this structure is demountable, Dezeen explains, so it can be “shifted from place to place.” In fact, the playhouse was recently, and temporarily, moved to Old Street in London as part of an exhibition celebrating Kyson’s firm’s 10th anniversary.

The design, including building materials, cost less than $12,500 to construct.

information and photography courtesy of Dezeen

DISCLAIMER: The following project does not feature Alucobond® aluminum composite material (ACM). The “Industry (Architecture)” section of our blog focuses on extraordinary architectural works from around the world. While this project does not feature our ACM, we have included comparable samples to what was used in the project above.

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